Celebrate National Pollinator Week

Updated: May 11

This year it is runs from June 21st - 27th, 2021. Pollinator Week was initiated and is managed by Pollinator Partnership, and fourteen years ago the U.S. Senate’s unanimous approval and designation of a week in June as “National Pollinator Week” marked a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations.

History of National Pollinator Week

Pollinator Week was initiated and is managed by Pollinator Partnership, and fourteen years ago the U.S. Senate’s unanimous approval and designation of a week in June as “National Pollinator Week” marked a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations. Pollinator Week has now grown into an international celebration, promoting the valuable ecosystem services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles.


While this year might not be a typical Pollinator Week due to the COVID-19 pandemic, people across the planet have pledged to continue promoting pollinator health and well-being through socially distant and responsible events. Through the numerous virtual gatherings, webinars, responsible planting sessions, socially distant garden and farm walks, and monument lightings, Pollinator Week 2021 is geared to be the busiest and best one yet!


Taking Part in Pollinator Week

Pollinator Week is an annual event celebrated internationally in support of pollinator health. It's a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what we can do to protect them. The great thing about Pollinator Week is that you can celebrate and get involved any way you like! Popular events include planting for pollinators, hosting socially distant garden tours, participating in online bee and butterfly ID workshops, and so much more. However you choose to celebrate this year, be sure to register your event on the map below, and share your story with us by tagging us on social media using the hashtag #PollinatorWeek.


What is Pollination & Why Pollinators are Important

Pollination is a vital stage in the life cycle of all flowering plants. When pollen is moved within a flower or carried from one flower to another of the same species it leads to fertilization. This transfer of pollen is necessary for healthy and productive native & agricultural ecosystems. pollinators are often keystone species, meaning that they are critical to an ecosystem. The work of pollinators ensures full harvests of crops and contributes to healthy plants everywhere. An estimated 1/3 of all foods and beverages is delivered by pollinators. In the U.S., pollination produces nearly $20 billion worth of products annually.

Identifying a series of plants that are great food sources for bees. Poppy, Hollyhock, Borage, Zinnia, Calendula and More!
These Plants Are A Major Food Sources for Bees

How Can You Make A Difference?

The number one thing that everyone can do is to provide plants for pollinators. This can be a large as corporate campuses or as small as window boxes, every pollinator plants makes a difference. Find a selection of native pollinator plants in your local area that are not invasive or crowd out local plants that pollinators currently use.

A Bee House with Tubes for the bees to lay eggs in for the next generation of bees
An Example of a Bee House

Ensure you select a wide variety of plants that bloom throughout the season to provide pollinator food sources from early spring through fall and plant clusters of plants that flower at the same time to provide a target feeding area. Provide dead branches and logs that can be used as nesting areas for the next generation of pollinators. Also adding pollinator hotels, like the one pictured above, will help them have a place to lay eggs to help make more pollinators. The USDA provide a graphic to think like a pollinator when planting a pollinator garden.

This is a layout provided by the USDA to ensure all of the right elements are present for pollinators
The USDA Think Like a Pollinator Garden Layout

Get More Involved

The organization that is the driving force behind Pollinator Week every year is Pollinator Partnership and can check out their site for all the activities around the US that are happening this week and even sign up for their newsletter so you don't miss out on future events. They have put together some great resources to help your get more involved and help our pollinators.

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